Archive for July, 2013

Jumelle Twin, Triplets, Quadruplet Baby Tracker

Posted on July 11, 2013. Filed under: Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

For parents with twins, triplets, quadruplets, quintuplets or two babies close together, many recognize the necessity need of a record of who did what and when and for how long.  Parents need to keep track of number of dirty diapers, feeding habits and duration, naps and bedtimes.  Such a tracking schedule can be very helpful to other caretakers (grandparents, family members, friends, nannies) who come into the house to assist with baby care.  The formal record quickly identifies which baby may be facing a challenge, e.g. constipation, and allows the caregivers to step in a timely fashion to help rectify the situation.  Careful tracking of each babies’ habits ensures that sleep-deprived parents are quickly on top of any issues with marginal room for error.

Tracking minimizes the chances of guesswork: I know someone missed a bowel movement today but which one?
The more children in the multiple-birth set, the more important accurate tracking becomes.   An additional important
issue to keep track of is if one, more or all infants are receiving medications or even vitamins.  Did I or didn’t I? and
which one?  It could be dire if a baby received two doses of medication in error.  Remove the guesswork, anxiety, possible overlap
and potential mistakes by keeping a recording schedule.
There are a couple of ways to keep track of which baby did what and it may include:
~creating a grid with each child’s name at the top, date and a list of items down the side which you would like to record
(dirty diapers, wet diapers, breastfeeding [left/right breast], duration of breastfeeding, time of nap [morning and afternoon],
duration of nap, bedtime [duration of sleep time], medications/vitamins given).
Check out the new multiple-birth Jumelle Twin and Baby Tracking App available on iTunes.  Good for iPhone and iPad,
(working on android).  This app quickly and easily tracks each baby, twin, triplet, quadruplet or quintuplet, in fact up
to 10 babies’ information can be uploaded.  JUMELLE is loaded with hints, tips and suggestions for getting through the latter part of the pregnancy,
delivery and first six weeks after the birth of your multiples.  Take a photo of each baby and upload it to the app.  Keep a record of each
baby’s teething issues, feeding habits, fevers, milestones.  There is a marvellous export feature to ensure information is shared with
multiples’ grandparents, child care centres, out of town parent, babies’ physician.  It has a nightlight feature so you can easily record what is
happening with the babies at nighttime.  Don’t struggle in a sleep-deprived fog to remember which baby, twin, triplet or quadruplet
did what.  The Jumelle Twin and Baby Tracker app keeps it all under control for you.
Lynda P. Haddon
Multiple Birth Educator

 

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Treating multiples as individuals

Posted on July 2, 2013. Filed under: Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , |

A good rule of thumb when dealing with twins, triplets or more and you are having challenges with behaviour, bedtimes, mealtimes, curfews, allowances and so much more, is to ignore the fact that they are multiples and ask yourself:  “how would I handle things if they were singleton children?”  Very often treating each child as an individual with individual interests, focuses, ideas, behaviour, growth and more, offers the solution.  Example:  a mother with triplets, two girls and a boy, shared that her son required less sleep (they were 15 months old) than her daughters and as they were all in the same room, he woke earlier and then bugged his sisters until they woke up.  In essence she was left with 3 cranky children for different reasons (one had no playmate and the other two needed more sleep time).  I advised that she had a natural split between the 3 and that at a certain point they would need to separate the children for privacy reasons, why not do it sooner rather than later?  She responded, “But they are triplets…..”   The parents were so stuck on the fact that they were triplets and ‘needed’ to be together, that they were unable to see that the children needed, quite early in their lives already, a different response for their individual needs.  If they had all been singletons, I suspect the answer of giving them separate rooms would have been more obvious.  Multiples do not need to be together just because they are multiples.  They need to separated for little periods of time to get used to being separate and enjoying the freedom of discovering their own interests and abilities; and they need to be together when there are family events, special occasions, mealtimes and so on, just like any of our children with benefit from.  Cheers!

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