Breastfeeding multiplies

Baby/Babies fussy when nursing

Posted on August 18, 2017. Filed under: Breastfeeding multiplies, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , |

Sometimes one or more babies can be fussy when put to the breast.  There could be several reasons why:  not really ready to feed even though the length from the last feed is reasonable; feeding position may be causing baby to have gas pain; too much distraction in the room; initially a heavy milk let down which baby is unable to tolerate; to name a few possibilities.

If one or more is latching, then popping off the breast, maybe arching their back, or difficult to settle into a feed on an ongoing basis, there are a couple of things you can try which may help out. Nurse in a quiet room, with a low light and some soothing music or sound machine (birds or running water sounds).  Nurse skin to skin.  Some Moms have success nursing a fussy baby/babies while in the bath.  If you try the latter, you may probably need to have some help nearby to hand you the babies to nurse and then take away for drying and dressing after their feed.

If you wish to know if the babies are transferring enough milk at each feed, you can try a weighted feed.  Weigh each baby before the feed and record their weights (you can easily keep track of the details on the Jumelle the Best Twin and Baby Tracking App available on http://www.jumelle.ca).  Weigh each baby again right after their feed and by comparing the two weights, you can tell if each baby is transferring an appropriate amount. Remember, because they are different children, the amounts won’t necessarily be the exactly same.

If the fussiness continues over several days, or the baby/babies are not transferring enough milk, check things out with their doctor and/or a certified lactation consultant to be sure that there are not any underlying issues which need addressing (e.g. baby frustration due to a tongue/lip tie).

 

 

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CHOCOLATE, CAFFEINE & BREASTFEEDING

Posted on July 28, 2017. Filed under: Breastfeeding multiplies, raising multiples, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , |

A recent series of posts highlighted the fine line between fact and fiction when it comes to breastfeeding. A mother-in-law’s counsel to her daughter-in-law, a new breastfeeding mother, to avoid chocolate and caffeine for its negative effect on baby, led to Internet uproar.  Indeed, mother-in-law was pilloried as a “liar.”

Whatever happened to perspective?

The culprit, if there is one, are similar, naturally occurring substances in coffee and chocolate that have stimulant effects. The cacao tree, Theobroma, contains theobromine while caffeine comes from the bean of the coffee tree. Both are stimulants and can cause irritability, wakefulness and jumpiness in people sensitive to the substances or who consume too much.

The blood – breast milk barrier is thankfully very efficient and for most breastfeeding mothers indulging in some chocolate or coffee causes no issue. Of course, moderation is important. Eat a pound of chocolate or drink eight cups of coffee in a row and baby might be as revved up as mom and, for sure, won’t sleep too well! No need, however, to abstain.

Knowledge is passed down from one generation to the next but that knowledge also needs to be updated. Breastfeeding mothers can take comfort in the effectiveness of the barrier between their body and what passes to the baby through the milk. This is not license, however, to abuse it.

So, enjoy that cup of coffee and no need to pass up the Godiva dark chocolate that goes so well with it!

 

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One Breast Under Performs….

Posted on June 29, 2017. Filed under: Breastfeeding multiplies, Jumelle Twin Tracking App, raising multiples | Tags: , , , , , |

Most women would be surprised to learn that it is very common to have one breast that is more productive in making milk than the other.  The differences in supply can range from minimal to quite dramatic.   This is normal and there is nothing “wrong” with you or your breasts.  LOL

If this is you, here are a couple of ideas to help increase supply in the lower producing breast:

  1.  It is not unusual to have one multiple who is a better, deeper sucker than his/her sibling(s).  Put your stronger sucker on the lower producing breast in order to cue it to produce more milk.
  2. Pump the lower producing breast after a nursing session thereby stimulating it to make more milk.

What have you done to increase supply in your lower producing breast?

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Mastitis and Blocked Ducts

Posted on June 23, 2017. Filed under: Breastfeeding multiplies, simultaneous breast feeding | Tags: , , , , , , , |

The following is general information only.  If you have any questions about any aspect of your health, please consult your physician.

Mastitis and/or Blocked Ducts are obstacles many, but not all, nursing women face once, or maybe several times, while nursing.  Both are caused by babies or pumping not completely draining the breast(s). Here are some ideas on how to handle them.

Mastitis

Is a bacterial infection of the breast that can occur in breastfeeding mothers. It is different from a blocked duct, which has similar symptoms. A blocked duct feels painful, is swollen, red and a mass can usually be felt within the breast. Mastitis has these same symptoms with the addition of fever and greater pain. It is easy to get the two mixed up. The added sign of a fever is the key that it is mastitis. It is important to see a physician if you have fever, breast pain (in one or both breasts) and redness for more than 24 hours, as antibiotics will need to be prescribed. Once antibiotics are prescribed improvement will be noticed within 2-5 days. Continue your course of antibiotics until they are finished or there is a chance the mastitis will return.

You can and should continue to breastfeed.  There is no need to pump and dump. Mastitis does not harm the babies and continuing to breastfeed will speed up the healing process. If you cannot put babies to breast because it is too painful, try pumping as best you can and bottle feed the milk to the babies. This will also help keep your supply up.

Blocked Ducts

These (there may be one or more) can also be very painful, skin becomes “hot” and a lump(s) can be felt when massaging the breast. For treatment of these, hard, deep massage at the point of the clog while baby is breastfeeding can be used. It is painful but the only way to pass the clog is through massage to move it along, and then baby nursing will clear the duct. The released clog will not hurt the baby. There is no need to pump and dump with blocked ducts either.

Some ways to relieve swelling for both Mastitis and Blocked Ducts:

-Heat applied to the affected areas helps healing;                                                                          -Massage in a hot shower;                                                                                                                    -Rest helps with infection;                                                                                                                    -Fever helps fight off infection;                                                                                                          -Medication (aspirin, ibuprofen) for pain can be helpful; and                                                   -Two external ways to help with swelling and hotness, 1) thinly sliced raw potatoes in the bra, and 2) cold cabbage leaves directly from the fridge in the bra helps sooth. Believe it, they work!!

 

 

 

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Should I continue Breastfeeding when I have a cold?

Posted on June 10, 2017. Filed under: Breastfeeding multiplies, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , |

Absolutely!  Breast milk is an amazing liquid and it regularly adjusts itself to you and your babies’ needs.  Further, if one of the babies is sick, do you assign only one breast to that baby or continue to switch them back and forth?  Continue nursing as you normally would.  Rotating babies on both breasts won’t hurt/affect the one who is currently not ill. Your breast milk continues to adjust and provide antibodies which are beneficial to yourself and each of your babies, whether they are sick or not.

For more of the amazing benefits of Mother’s Milk, check out this TED Talk:

What We Don’t Know About Mother’s Milk

Sent from TED app for IOS                                                                                                                   https://itunes.com/apps/tedconferences/ted

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I feel sad about breast feeding…..

Posted on May 1, 2017. Filed under: Breastfeeding multiplies, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , |

Let me clarify.  I feel sad because some women seem to need to loudly, strongly, rightly and aggressively defend their desire to breastfeed until forever, or nurse in public for that matter.  My sadness comes from the”aggressively” part.  I think women and their children have a right to breast feed as long as it works for them without judgement, harassment or any negativity whatsoever.  I believe a nursing woman has the right to breast feed whenever and wherever she or her baby or babies need, as long as the location is safe for all.  Preferably not while a climbing a cliff, as an example.  LOL Adults eat in public, why shouldn’t babies and infants have the same rights and expectations?

I like to think that I am a bridge builder and a teacher.  My problem is when a woman begins to fight and declare her, and her child’s rights, even before there is a battle to be fought.  That attitude is not a teaching one nor a bridge-building one and, in fact, most encounters will end up with no winners.  If you go looking for trouble, trust me, you will find it.

I would suggest waiting until each and every obstacle presents itself and gently stopping the person and asking them to come on board and be a part of a solution and not a part of a problem.  Start with family and friends and explain, each and every time, that this is what your family has chosen and you would love them to be positive throughout this journey.  Stopping negativity in a loving, caring, teaching way is the goal.  There will always be someone who objects, shouts, judges, declares, and lots of other things, but we don’t have to play that game.  We do not have to roar, respond, justify, give tit or tat (pardon the pun).  As Michelle Obama says “When they go low, we go high.”  When one walks with a Big Stick, one risks tripping over it.

It saddens me that women angrily anticipate negativity about nursing in public or the age their children should be weaned at.  It isn’t any one else’s business but that particular family’s and whatever that family chooses in regards to breastfeeding won’t change what you have for supper, so don’t fight BEFORE there is a fight.  Do what women do best:  Teach, show patience, tolerance, love, smile, be firm and gentle.  All of this goes along with, IMO, tons of strength.

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Can I mix bottles of breastmilk?

Posted on April 16, 2017. Filed under: Breastfeeding multiplies, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , |

Breastmilk can be mixed together from two different pumpings, as long as the milk is the same temperature.  So, if you have some bottled milk stored in the fridge and wish to add a new batch, wait until the new batch has been cooled in the fridge then mix the two batches together.  The new, warmer milk should not be mixed with the colder stored milk.

You will notice that breastmilk will separate into two layers.  The fatter part of the breastmilk has risen to the top the same as when we have whole cow’s milk and the cream rises to the top.  A quick shake before using mixes it all together again.

 

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Pumping While Driving = Distracted Driving

Posted on March 27, 2017. Filed under: Breastfeeding multiplies, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , |

Apparently some breastfeeding Moms are trying to save some time and pumping on their way to work.  I checked with the Ontario Provincial Police (OPP) Department and was told that this is distracted driving and the fine would be $400.00 if a woman was stopped and found to be pumping as well as driving.

Please reconsider this practice and keep safe while also ensuring those around you remain safe too.

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One Breast is More Productive than the Other

Posted on March 26, 2017. Filed under: Breastfeeding multiplies, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , |

If at any point you are worried about any aspect of your nursing situation, check things out with a CERTIFIED lactation consultant.  

It is common for women to have one breast which is more productive than the other. There is nothing at all wrong with you if this is the case for you.  The differences in production came be slight to quite dramatic.  There are some strategies for handling the difference.

~one baby can be a better sucker than his sibling(s).  Put this baby on the lower producing breast at a feed so that he can remove as much of the available milk as possible from this breast.  Baby B can go on the other and no doubt take advantage of the simultaneous let down.  Baby A can be transferred to the better producing breast for the rest of the feed when his brother is finished, should he still need to nurse.

~when pumping, use a hospital-grade strength pump.  These, with a stronger motor, are usually not for sale but can often be rented/borrowed from a hospital.  Use the hospital-grade pump for pumping both breasts.

~continue to nurse the babies and/or pump at regular intervals, including through the night as if feeding a baby, keep your fluid levels up and stress levels as lows as possible.  All three of these affect production.

 

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See ALL babies right after birth

Posted on December 6, 2011. Filed under: Breastfeeding multiplies | Tags: , , , , |

It is really important that EACH or ALL babies be brought to the parents after birth so that both parents and the babies themselves can be touched, loved on, smelled and cooed over.  You don’t want a time lapse between having both or all babies with you, right from the beginning.  One Mom did not see Twin B until one hour after birth but she had Twin A from birth.  There were bonding difficulties and a preference as a result.  The decision not to bring Twin B to the parents was made by a well-meaning nurse, who apparently thought, ‘they look so comfortable with their baby, I will just take this one to the nursery.’  Babies are not interchangeable and it is recommended that both or all babies be seen and held after birth.  This skin to skin connection also helps with breastfeeding and milk stimulation.

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