One Breast Under Performs….

Posted on June 29, 2017. Filed under: Breastfeeding multiplies, Jumelle Twin Tracking App, raising multiples | Tags: , , , , , |

Most women would be surprised to learn that it is very common to have one breast that is more productive in making milk than the other.  The differences in supply can range from minimal to quite dramatic.   This is normal and there is nothing “wrong” with you or your breasts.  LOL

If this is you, here are a couple of ideas to help increase supply in the lower producing breast:

  1.  It is not unusual to have one multiple who is a better, deeper sucker than his/her sibling(s).  Put your stronger sucker on the lower producing breast in order to cue it to produce more milk.
  2. Pump the lower producing breast after a nursing session thereby stimulating it to make more milk.

What have you done to increase supply in your lower producing breast?

Advertisements
Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

Should I continue Breastfeeding when I have a cold?

Posted on June 10, 2017. Filed under: Breastfeeding multiplies, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , |

Absolutely!  Breast milk is an amazing liquid and it regularly adjusts itself to you and your babies’ needs.  Further, if one of the babies is sick, do you assign only one breast to that baby or continue to switch them back and forth?  Continue nursing as you normally would.  Rotating babies on both breasts won’t hurt/affect the one who is currently not ill. Your breast milk continues to adjust and provide antibodies which are beneficial to yourself and each of your babies, whether they are sick or not.

For more of the amazing benefits of Mother’s Milk, check out this TED Talk:

What We Don’t Know About Mother’s Milk

Sent from TED app for IOS                                                                                                                   https://itunes.com/apps/tedconferences/ted

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

QUICK BREASTFEEDING TIPS

Posted on March 7, 2017. Filed under: Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , |

IF YOU HAVE ANY CONCERNS ABOUT YOUR BABIES’ FEEDING HABITS, CHECK IT OUT WITH A CERTIFIED LACTATION CONSULTANT OR YOUR DOCTOR

New infants often fall asleep at the breast before their tummies are full. They need to be woken and encouraged to drink further or you will be back at nursing within a half hour or so.

The lactating breast is never “empty.” It is just “less full.” If you pump after nursing, getting 1/4 to 1/2 ounce is good and it all adds up over time.

It is not unusual to have a good sucker and a fussier sucker. Put the good sucker on first when simultaneously feeding and then spend more time adjusting the fussier baby.

Breastfeeding automatically makes Mom thirsty. Make sure you have a cold drink beside you prior to beginning. Hot drinks can be easily knocked over. Don’t take the risk.

Babies suck about 10-12 minutes and then they are full. Nursing for 15 minutes or longer, well, they aren’t really sucking that whole time but more likely enjoying the position, warmth and Mom’s loving arms.

Nursing babies are full when they begin to relax at the breast. A clenched hand may open and gently rest on the breast, face relaxes, mouth opens and baby falls off.

Healthy, nursing babies generally have one dirty diaper plus 5 or 6 very wet ones in 24 hours. That is how you know they are getting enough nourishment.

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

Supplementing dilemma

Posted on January 27, 2012. Filed under: Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , |

It isn’t widely understood that after a baby’s suckles, the breasts are not “empty” as many people think they might be.  Breasts never completely empty after a feed.  Pumping for multiples after breastfeeding is very common with Moms of multiples and what is collected is saved, frozen and ready to use at another time.  There won’t be a huge supply, but you can collect anywhere from maybe 1/2 ounce to 1 ounce additional milk.  A bonus is that when pumping, your breasts are receiving the message that there is a greater demand and therefore the supply increases.  Some Moms feels the need, and their babies indicate the need, to supplement.  It is helpful to keep in mind that each time we supplement, we are by passing the message to our breasts of a greater demand, so it can feel necessary to continue supplementing due to ‘lack of supply.’  Supplementing can set up a vicious circle and cause Mom much anxiety as she may feel her babies are hungary and she really doesn’t have enough milk.  Breast feeding the babies as they need/demand will, over 2-4 days, increase the milk supply to satisfy them.

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

Liked it here?
Why not try sites on the blogroll...