One Breast Under Performs….

Posted on June 29, 2017. Filed under: Breastfeeding multiplies, Jumelle Twin Tracking App, raising multiples | Tags: , , , , , |

Most women would be surprised to learn that it is very common to have one breast that is more productive in making milk than the other.  The differences in supply can range from minimal to quite dramatic.   This is normal and there is nothing “wrong” with you or your breasts.  LOL

If this is you, here are a couple of ideas to help increase supply in the lower producing breast:

  1.  It is not unusual to have one multiple who is a better, deeper sucker than his/her sibling(s).  Put your stronger sucker on the lower producing breast in order to cue it to produce more milk.
  2. Pump the lower producing breast after a nursing session thereby stimulating it to make more milk.

What have you done to increase supply in your lower producing breast?

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Mastitis and Blocked Ducts

Posted on June 23, 2017. Filed under: Breastfeeding multiplies, simultaneous breast feeding | Tags: , , , , , , , |

The following is general information only.  If you have any questions about any aspect of your health, please consult your physician.

Mastitis and/or Blocked Ducts are obstacles many, but not all, nursing women face once, or maybe several times, while nursing.  Both are caused by babies or pumping not completely draining the breast(s). Here are some ideas on how to handle them.

Mastitis

Is a bacterial infection of the breast that can occur in breastfeeding mothers. It is different from a blocked duct, which has similar symptoms. A blocked duct feels painful, is swollen, red and a mass can usually be felt within the breast. Mastitis has these same symptoms with the addition of fever and greater pain. It is easy to get the two mixed up. The added sign of a fever is the key that it is mastitis. It is important to see a physician if you have fever, breast pain (in one or both breasts) and redness for more than 24 hours, as antibiotics will need to be prescribed. Once antibiotics are prescribed improvement will be noticed within 2-5 days. Continue your course of antibiotics until they are finished or there is a chance the mastitis will return.

You can and should continue to breastfeed.  There is no need to pump and dump. Mastitis does not harm the babies and continuing to breastfeed will speed up the healing process. If you cannot put babies to breast because it is too painful, try pumping as best you can and bottle feed the milk to the babies. This will also help keep your supply up.

Blocked Ducts

These (there may be one or more) can also be very painful, skin becomes “hot” and a lump(s) can be felt when massaging the breast. For treatment of these, hard, deep massage at the point of the clog while baby is breastfeeding can be used. It is painful but the only way to pass the clog is through massage to move it along, and then baby nursing will clear the duct. The released clog will not hurt the baby. There is no need to pump and dump with blocked ducts either.

Some ways to relieve swelling for both Mastitis and Blocked Ducts:

-Heat applied to the affected areas helps healing;                                                                          -Massage in a hot shower;                                                                                                                    -Rest helps with infection;                                                                                                                    -Fever helps fight off infection;                                                                                                          -Medication (aspirin, ibuprofen) for pain can be helpful; and                                                   -Two external ways to help with swelling and hotness, 1) thinly sliced raw potatoes in the bra, and 2) cold cabbage leaves directly from the fridge in the bra helps sooth. Believe it, they work!!

 

 

 

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One Breast is More Productive than the Other

Posted on March 26, 2017. Filed under: Breastfeeding multiplies, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , |

If at any point you are worried about any aspect of your nursing situation, check things out with a CERTIFIED lactation consultant.  

It is common for women to have one breast which is more productive than the other. There is nothing at all wrong with you if this is the case for you.  The differences in production came be slight to quite dramatic.  There are some strategies for handling the difference.

~one baby can be a better sucker than his sibling(s).  Put this baby on the lower producing breast at a feed so that he can remove as much of the available milk as possible from this breast.  Baby B can go on the other and no doubt take advantage of the simultaneous let down.  Baby A can be transferred to the better producing breast for the rest of the feed when his brother is finished, should he still need to nurse.

~when pumping, use a hospital-grade strength pump.  These, with a stronger motor, are usually not for sale but can often be rented/borrowed from a hospital.  Use the hospital-grade pump for pumping both breasts.

~continue to nurse the babies and/or pump at regular intervals, including through the night as if feeding a baby, keep your fluid levels up and stress levels as lows as possible.  All three of these affect production.

 

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How long did you breastfeed your babies?

Posted on November 19, 2014. Filed under: Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , |

How long did you exclusively breastfeed your babies?

I have:   twins  _____      triplets   ______

4 months

6 months

10 months

longer _______, how long   ______

anything in between?    _________

Did you supplement with formula at any time?    Yes       No

How old were your babies when you began supplementing?   ________________

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